BLOG TOUR: Murder By The Bottle by Ed Whitfield

“Homicidal Thoughts? Don’t bottle them up – buy the year’s most exciting psychological thriller. A killer read you’ll never forget.”

The debut book by Ed Whitfield, released on 17th June, Murder By The Bottle follows Keir Rothwell, an angry young man, spurned by his lover and mentor and removed from his art school for an inappropriate installation at the end of year show. Determined this will not be the end of his artistic endeavours, he gets a new job in a local wine shop that gives him a creative outlet, a chance to turn shop floor drudgery into an original work of art. But his wine critiques mock the shop’s clientele and tension builds on both sides of the counter. When his new project is threatened, conflict becomes murder and long-buried secrets threaten to destroy the artist. But Keir Rothwell will not be undone.

Rating:

Today is my stop on the blog tour for this book. Thank you to RedDoor Press for a free advance copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

Murder By The Bottle is a brilliantly written and expertly crafted story that delves into the dark and ludicrous mind of a psychopath, intelligently exploring the narrow-minded, self-absorbed, and completely deranged nature of someone living on the periphery of normal society.

There’s a dark satire that runs throughout the narrative, but maybe that’s in how you engage with Kier’s character. Because I love a disturbed character that you can’t help but relate to in their frustration with other humans. Sometimes we all have that impatience with our behaviour as a species, and I really enjoyed Kier’s mockery of the shop’s clientele and ignorance of other’s opinions. Of course, I would never want to be friends with him, but I loved this in-depth look into his mind, however reliable it may be.

The book ends with a journalist’s analysis of Kier’s story, using Murder By The Bottle as a story within the story, and I think this is an ingenious technique. I loved this deconstruction of the story and examination into how much we can trust the narrator. Because even though they seem to be willing to share everything, Whitfield also makes you very aware of how someone like Kier would see themselves as an indestructible hero, and would be unwilling to acknowledge their own flaws.

This is a great debut by Ed Whitfield who obviously knows how to write, construct an intriguing plot, create fully-fleshed characters, and draw the reader in. If you want to know how to write your first book, this is how you do it.

Details:

Murder By The Bottle by Ed Whitfield
Release Date: 17th June 2021
Print Length: 320 pages
Genre: Crime Thriller
Publisher: RedDoor Press

Buy: Amazon | Waterstones | Foyles | Kobo

Synopsis:

Keir Rothwell is an angry young man.Spurned by his lover and mentor and removed from his art school for an inappropriate installation at the end of year show, he is determined this will not be the end of his artistic endeavours. A new job in a local wine shop gives Keir a creative outlet a chance to turn shop floor drudgery into an original work of art. But his wine critiques mock the shop’s clientele and tension builds on both sides of the counter. When his new project is threatened, conflict becomes murder and long-buried secrets threaten to destroy the artist. But Keir Rothwell will not be undone. Tautly written and threaded with dark humour, Murder by the Bottle is a compelling study in character, criminality and truth.

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