TV Review: The Pembrokeshire Murders (ITV) – Miniseries

The Pembrokeshire Murders is a three-part miniseries that aired on ITV in January 2021. The series follows the true story of newly promoted Detective Superintendent Steve Wilkins (Luke Evans) as he investigates the Pembrokeshire murders by Welsh serial killer John Cooper (Keith Allen) in the 1980s. With advances in technology for Forensic DNA analysis, witness reports and artists impressions of the suspect, Wilkins decides to re-open two unsolved murder cases linked with a string of burglaries. When Dyfed-Powys Police review a 1989 episode of Bullseye, this ultimately leads them to finally catch the serial killer.

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Film Review: Beauty And The Beast (2017)

Directed by Bill Condon and a live-action adaptation of Disney’s 1991 animated film, which is an adaptation of Jeanne-Marie Leprince de Beaumont‘s 18th-century fairy tale, Beauty And The Beast follows a selfish prince (Dan Stevens) who is cursed to become a monster for the rest of his life, unless he learns to fall in love. When a bright, beautiful and independent young woman, Belle (Emma Watson) enters his enchanted castle, Beast takes her prisoner. Despite her fears, she befriends the castle’s enchanted staff and learns to look beyond the Beast’s hideous exterior and realize the kind heart and soul of the true Prince within.

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Film Review: The Girl On The Train

Directed by by Tate Taylor and based on the book by British Paula Hawkins, The Girl on the Train follows an alcohol divorcee, Rachel (Emily Blunt), who takes the same train to work every single day. As Rachel passes by the same houses, she comes to recognise the people she sees and begins fantasising about the relationships and lives of those that reside there. One of these houses belongs to her ex-husband, Tom (Justin Theroux), who now lives with Anna (Rebecca Ferguson), who he cheated on Rachel with, and their baby daughter. A few doors down, Rachel spends most of her commute fantasising about the seemingly happy lives of Scott (Luke Evans) and Megan Hipwell (Haley Bennett). But everything changes when Rachel witnesses something from the train window and Megan is later found to be missing, presumed dead. Becoming entangled in a missing person’s investigation, Rachel’s involvement promises to send shockwaves throughout both her past and future.

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Book v Film: The Girl On The Train

“I have never understood how people can blithely disregard the damage they do by following their hearts. Who was it said that following your heart is a good thing? It is pure egotism, a selfishness to conquer all.”

Directed by by Tate Taylor and based on the book by British Paula Hawkins, The Girl on the Train follows an alcohol divorcee, Rachel (Emily Blunt), who takes the same train to work every single day. As Rachel passes by the same houses, she comes to recognise the people she sees and begins fantasising about the relationships and lives of those that reside there. One of these houses belongs to her ex-husband, Tom (Justin Theroux), who now lives with Anna (Rebecca Ferguson), who he cheated on Rachel with, and their baby daughter. A few doors down, Rachel spends most of her commute fantasising about the seemingly happy lives of Scott (Luke Evans) and Megan Hipwell (Haley Bennett). But everything changes when Rachel witnesses something from the train window and Megan is later found to be missing, presumed dead. Becoming entangled in a missing person’s investigation, Rachel’s involvement promises to send shockwaves throughout both her past and future.

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You Should Be Reading: The Girl On The Train

“I have never understood how people can blithely disregard the damage they do by following their hearts. Who was it said that following your heart is a good thing? It is pure egotism, a selfishness to conquer all.”

Written by British author Paula Hawkins, and quickly becoming one of the fastest-selling novels in history after its release in January 2015, debuting at No. 1 on The New York Times Fiction Best Sellers of 2015 list, The Girl On The Train is a psychological thriller that follows an alcohol divorcee, Rachel Watson, who takes the same train to work every single day. As Rachel passes by the same houses, she comes to recognise the people she sees and begins fantasising about the relationships and lives of those that reside there. One of these houses belongs to her ex-husband Tom, who now lives with Anna, who he cheated on Rachel with, and their baby daughter. A few doors down, Rachel spends most of her commute fantasising about the seemingly happy lives of Scott and Megan Hipwell. But everything changes when Rachel witnesses something from the train window and Megan is later found to be missing, presumed dead. Becoming entangled in a missing person’s investigation, Rachel’s involvement promises to send shockwaves throughout both her past and future.

Set to be released on 5th October, the film adaptation is directed by Tate Taylor and stars Emily Blunt as Rachel, Rebecca Ferguson as Anna, Haley Bennett as Megan, Justin Theroux as Tom, Luke Evans as Scott, Allison Janney as Detective Sgt. Riley, and Édgar Ramírez as Dr Kamal Abdic.

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Film Review: The Hobbit – The Battle of the Five Armies

From the author of The Lord of The Rings trilogy, J. R. R. Tolkien, and the same crew behind their film adaptations, Peter Jackson and his writing team, The Battle of the Five Armies is the final instalment in a trilogy of films based on the classic fantasy novel, The Hobbit. Picking up from The Desolation of Smaug, this final third follows on with the dwarves as they attempt to reclaim their homeland of Erebor, as the titular battle ensues on The Lonely Mountain, with the Goblins and the Wargs fighting against the Men of Lake-town, the Elves, the Dwarves and Eagles.

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Book v Film: The Hobbit – The Battle of the Five Armies

“Farewell, Master Burglar. Go back to your books, your fireplace. Plant your trees, watch them grow. If more of us valued home above gold, it would be a merrier world.”

From the author of The Lord of The Rings trilogy, J. R. R. Tolkien, and the same crew behind their film adaptations, Peter Jackson and his writing team, The Battle of the Five Armies is the final instalment in a trilogy of films based on the classic fantasy novel, The Hobbit. Picking up from The Desolation of Smaug, this final third follows on with the dwarves as they attempt to reclaim their homeland of Erebor, as the titular battle ensues on The Lonely Mountain, with the Goblins and the Wargs fighting against the Men of Lake-town, the Elves, the Dwarves and Eagles.

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You Should Be Reading: The Hobbit

“Now it is a strange thing, but things that are good to have and days that are good to spend are soon told about, and not much to listen to; while things that are uncomfortable, palpitating, and even gruesome, may make a good tale, and take a deal of telling anyway.”

Yes, you should be reading The Hobbit …or at least the final 85 pages of J. R. R. Tolkien‘s classic fantasy story, that is.

From the author of The Lord of The Rings trilogy, and with the same crew behind their film adaptations, the final instalment in a trilogy of adaptations, The Battle of the Five Armies, is set to be released on 12th December.

Although they are all based on the same, single book, The Hobbit trilogy of films began with An Unexpected Journey in 2012, followed with The Desolation of Smaug in 2013, and is set to conclude at the end of this year.

Again directed by Peter Jackson, the final instalment will focus on the final third of The Hobbit book, as the dwarves attempt to reclaim their homeland of Erebor.

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First Trailer & Poster for ‘The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey’

(Written for BritScene)

Warner Bros. Pictures has released the first trailer for Peter Jackson‘s The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey online today. Not only is the trailer brilliant, but there’s also a lot of British actors in this, and we already can’t wait to see it.

The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey is the first of a two-part series of films to be adapted from J.R.R. Tolkien‘s novel of the same name, the prequel to The Lord of the Rings trilogy. Jackson, director of The Lord of the Rings, returns as director and also serves as producer and co-writer.

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Film Review: Immortals

(Published in Issue 4 of my publication In Retrospect and on BritScene)

Rating:

From the producers of 300 and directed by Tarsem Singh, Immortals is a 3D fantasy action based on the Greek myths of Theseus and the Minotaur.

Taking place in 1228BC, a mortal man named Theseus (Henry Cavill) is chosen by Zeus (Luke Evans) and the Greek Gods to lead a fight against the barbarous King Hyperion (Mickey Rourke), who has declared war on Olympus after the Gods fail to answer his prayers. Hyperion, now on a rampage across Greece, seeks the magical bow of Epirus in order to free the Titans, defy the Gods and destroy all of humanity. Theseus, however, now seeks the Bow for himself. After escaping from prison and befriending a prisoner named Stavros (Stephen Dorff), he meets the beautiful oracle Phaedra (Freida Pinto) who is convinced by her own disturbing visions that he may just be the key to stopping the destruction. With her help, Theseus assembles a small band of followers as, after stealing the bow for himself, Hyperion’s soldiers attack Phaedra’s temple and release the Titans. With Hyperion forcing his army to face a war against the Gods themselves, Theseus must embrace his destiny in a final battle to save the future of humanity.

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Film Review: The Three Musketeers

(Published on BritScene and read in my publication In Retrospect – Issue 3)

Rating:

Based on a 1844 French novel titled Les Trois Mousquetaires, written by Alexandre Dumas, The Three Musketeers has had a wide range of TV and film adaptations. Directed by Paul W.S. Anderson, this latest reinterpretation is a 3D adaptation following the same story but with a cast of new faces that takes advantage of the latest cinema technology.

Set in the 17th century, the handsome D’Artagnan (Logan Lerman) travels to Paris in hope of joining the famed Musketeers, Athos (Matthew Macfadyen), Aramis (Luke Evans) and Porthos (Ray Stevenson), who are currently down on their luck. Now, they must now unite to defeat a beautiful double agent, Milady De Winter (Milla Jovovich), who is playing both sides with the evil Duke of Buckingham (Orlando Bloom) in a plan to seize the French throne and engulf Europe in war.

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